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  • Ian Lancaster

Caring for a Pressure Sore

Stage I or II sores will heal if cared for carefully. Stage III and IV sores are harder to treat and may take a long time to heal.


Relieve the pressure on the area.

  • Use special pillows, foam cushions, booties, or mattress pads to reduce the pressure. Some pads are water- or air-filled to help support and cushion the area. What type of cushion you use depends on your wound and whether you are in bed or in a wheelchair. Talk with your health care provider about what choices would be best for you, including what shapes and types of material.

  • Change positions often. If you are in a wheelchair, try to change your position every 15 minutes. If you are in bed, you should be moved about every 2 hours.

Care for the sore as directed by your health care provider. Keep the wound clean to prevent infection. Clean the sore every time you change a dressing.

  • For a stage I sore, you can wash the area gently with mild soap and water. If needed, use a moisture barrier to protect the area from bodily fluids. Ask your provider what type of moisturiser to use.

  • Stage II pressure sores should be cleaned with a salt water (saline) rinse to remove loose, dead tissue. Or, your provider may recommend a specific cleanser.

  • DO NOT use hydrogen peroxide or iodine cleansers. They can damage skin.

  • Keep the sore covered with a special dressing. This protects against infection and helps keep the sore moist so it can heal. DermaSaver is perfect for this!


Avoid further injury or friction.

Wear DermaSaver at all times.

  • Avoid slipping or sliding as you move positions. Try to avoid positions that put pressure on your sore.

  • Care for healthy skin by keeping it clean and moisturized.

  • Check your skin for pressure sores every day. Ask your caregiver or someone you trust to check areas you can't see.

  • If the pressure sore changes or a new one forms, tell your doctor.




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